Hand Safety

Hand Safety – Gloves

Hand and finger injuries are among the most common work place injuries. The National Safety Council has many articles and presentations pertaining to hand and finger safety.  A good place to start reading about how to protect your hands and fingers can be found in this National Safety Council slide deck. Many hand injuries can be eliminated by simply wearing the correct type of gloves for the job being preformed. There is a huge selection of gloves available that protect a person’s hands and fingers from exposure to chemicals, cuts and abrasions, cold and heat, and even electrical shock hazards. There are many sources to help workers select the proper gloves for a given job.  These sources include OSHA, many health and safety companies, colleges and universities; corporate EHS departs, and research organizations.   Most suppliers of safety gloves have guides to help users select the most appropriate gloves for the…

Eye Safety

Eye Protection & Safety

Don’t ever take your eyes for granted. The gift of sight, even if you’re color blind or need glasses, remains one of the most powerful ways to interpret information as it is presented to you. Remember if your employer or your friend’s employer refuses to conform to proper workplace standards, all workers have certain rights, including reporting a health and safety issue or filing an injury claim, that you should not be afraid to exercise in case you’re putting your eyes, life, or limbs in danger. So throw on your favorite safety glasses and read up on tips and tricks to avoid any potentially hazardous situation involving eyes. Obviously some jobs and activities put workers more at risk for these type of incidents than others. Those who work with chemicals, such as medical employees, laboratory workforce, and even custodial staff need to take certain precautions. Whenever applying a chemical treatment, wear…

Ladders

General Ladder Safety – Part 3 – Straight Ladders

This last installment in a series on ladder safety will focus on straight ladders, and, since they are normally very similar in function, job-built wooden ladders.  While both step ladders and extension ladders are all mobile, job-built wooden ladders might be constructed so that they are fixed in location and cannot be moved.  With straight ladders, moving them from position to position, or to different job locations requires consideration of safely positioning them, awareness of other people or obstacles while moving them, and making sure they are secure while transporting them to a work location.  Legal considerations can also be important—in most cases objects (ladders in this case) positioned on a vehicle that extend more than 1 foot beyond the vehicle are required to have flags attached to make them clearly visible to other drivers. We will cover the use of these ladders after a short bit about the construction…